Tech We’d Like To See: The Dead Actor’s Studio

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Imagine a young Marlon Brando starring alongside Johnny Depp, or Audrey Hepburn playing rival to Sandra Bullock as Marilyn Monroe stops by for a catty cameo.

Depending on how you look at it, this is either tantalizing ‘fantasy film making’ or else an utterly horrible, cash-in exercise in Hollywood excess. Whatever your viewpoint, it does seem likely that someone, somewhere will try this in the near future.

About three years ago, the news broke that George Lucas, the genius behind the ‘Star Wars’ merchandise (and a couple of related movies), was buying up the likeness rights to a plethora of iconic, yet deceased, leading men and famous actresses from Hollywood’s golden age. His plan? To use a concoction of existing footage, CGI and motion capture to create reasonable facsimiles of classic Hollywood stars and have them appear in future films, despite the notable handicap of being, well, dead. Continue reading

THE SHIFT TO DIGITAL, why NASCAR choose Motorola

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NASCAR officials have enthusiastically embraced MOTOTRBO, and they applaud the benefits it has brought to the NASCAR experience. Smooth Management of Communications Traffic MOTOTRBO “does a super job for us,” according to Kerry Tharp, Director of Communications, NASCAR. “You have to communicate pre-race, during the race, and most importantly for us, post-race because when the race is over, that’s when our media operation kicks in for us full-bore. We bring in our top three drivers for interviews; we bring in our winning driver to the victory lane, and we also check in on the garage to make sure that post-race is going along as it should. We have to make sure we’re communicating quickly and concisely. Through MOTOTRBO, we’re able to do our jobs a whole lot better than we have in the past.” Continue reading

The PD782, PD785 & PD702 Hytera Radios are starting to take some of the digital market from Motorola, what makes them so good?

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The PD782, PD785 and PD702 Hytera radios are affordable, as well as being easy to use and providing high quality audio. This is a good combination when it comes to two-way radios, a technology that, by definition, needs to be durable, easily replaceable and effortlessly useable in case of emergency.

The parent company, Hytera, have been operating since 1993 and in that time they have developed a strong reputation as an industry leader. In short, they are in the process of cultivating a trusted international brand. Hytera are an emerging brand with a considerable track record for producing quality technology at premium prices.

Another likely source of Hytera’s recent success is the effectiveness of the Hytera earpiece. The Hytera multi-pin earpiece is designed for use with the PD702 and PD782 radio models. It features excellent playback, as well as being solid and durable. This Hytera earpiece is available for around £40.00 and is a professional level model, proving highly effective for many modern surveillance exercises.

Returning to the two-way radio discussion, Hytera radios include a number of advanced features, including a robust design, as well as a full colour LCD display, something that is a rarity in today’s market. There are also a high number of messaging options.

The PD785 is IP57 rated. This means that it can even be completely submerged for up to 30 minutes without obtaining any significant damage. It can also switch between analogue and digital mode and features full digital encryption.

Hytera have received a boost in sales because they have created a series of products that are up-to-date, hardwearing and professional. Two-way radios need to be reliable as a matter of fact, which is why these products are selling so well.  

How to improve your hearing

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Recently, when I was at my younger brother’s birthday celebration, my Dad made a reference to having tinnitus (basically a low-level ringing in the ears) and I informed him that I had made a gag about tinnitus in a recent post (for those concerned, the funny story was that it made things sound ‘a lttle bit tinny’ – Not one of my better japes, I confess, but whatever…). He looked at me like I had just farted in church while I rapidly changed the subject. Continue reading

Icom Launch New Training Aids for VHF/SRC Radio Instructors

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Editorial – Some people would not know much about DSC technology, nevertheless it’s a safety system built into 2 way radios, mainly in marine and sea communications, as of the increase in use of smaller and personal boats on the rivers. As a island this tech is becoming more and more popular, the technology is linked to your boat just in case of an emergency, more details is found from this icom uk article..

DSC technology is becoming more widely used today and it is important for potential users to see how it works and to be trained in its use. To this end, Icom UK have now added their latest range of VHF/DSC radios to their VHF/SRC training simulator range. The models now available for instructors to purchase include the IC-M423 Fixed Mount VHF/DSC Transceiver and for the first time from Icom, a Handheld VHF/DSC in the form of the IC-M91D. Both training simulators provide a real ‘hands on’ experience of both voice and DSC message sending and receiving, in the classroom without causing interference. Both models share a new easy to use interface which is easy to learn, meaning that trainees will be able to understand the basics of two way radio quickly. Ian Lockyer, Marketing Manager of Icom UK Ltd, said, ’When choosing the Icom IC-M423 VHF/SRC training simulator, the instructor will receive two fully modified radios that will communicate via the cabling so that it is unlikely to cause any interference to other users nearby . This enables the trainee to send ‘live’ distress and voice calls without alerting any other radios. Both units come with an interconnecting cable up to 20 metres in length, which is ideal for any training environment. The IC-M91D is supplied with an adapter and a cable to allow it to communicate with the fixed sets.’ To help trainees further understand the need for DSC, Icom has a new microsite dedicated to Handheld DSC radio. The new website sheds light on this relatively new marine technology. It explains what DSC Handheld VHF radios are, where they can be used and why boat owners need one. It also answers several questions about the ownership and registration of DSC handheld radio in an informative FAQ section. To go to this new site, click on www.dschandheld.com. The microsite will provide a handy resource for both instructors and students alike. Ian, said, ‘Customer reaction has been incredibly positive to our recently launched IC-M91D Buoyant VHF/DSC Handheld with GPS. However we have had lots of questions regarding where and how they can be used. So we decided to put all our information on an informative microsite.’ Icom Marketing: marketing@icomuk.co.uk

02/11/2012

 

Source – http://www.icomuk.co.uk/categoryRender.asp?r=rssFeed&categoryID=3508&cCID=17736

The Best DP 2400 earpiece

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Well, dear readers, here it is, the last of our five-part series on two-way radio earpieces.

We’ve thrown completely random pop-culture references at you (everything from ‘Wacky Races’ to 007 himself) and we’ve (hopefully) had a few laughs amongst all the dry facts and data. If you’ve read all of these things so far, then thanks, we appreciate your time.

OK, so the final item on our list is the Motorola DP2400 earpiece, which is the most expensive device we’ve viewed so far, albeit by only £1. The DP2400 earpiece, then, (for those amongst you who haven’t been keeping count) can be purchased from Earpieceonline for £29.75.

For your hard-earned wonga, you get a 12-month failure warranty (always a welcome and appreciated feature), as well as an excellent little device, all things considered.

The DP2400 earpiece features extra-long Kevlar strengthened cabling (although its unlikely that the cable will stop a bullet, we’re just telling you that now), as well as a rotating sprung metal clip, which is a genuine improvement on the more stationary design (although you probably can’t break out that Sumo suit just yet) and an excellent inline microphone.

The sound quality is very, very good and the earpiece itself is generally strong and durable. With this earpiece, you’ll be able to hear any instruction clearly and cleanly.

The DP2400 earpiece also features a multipin plug, but the plug is only designed to fit the Motorola DP2400 and DP2600 series. It will not work with the DP3400 or DP4800 series, which severely limits its appeal in this area, as it renders the DP2400 earpiece less versatile than the other, cheaper models on this list.

Overall, this is a very nice earpiece indeed. Performance wise, however, there’s not a lot to choose from between any of the earpieces featured on this list, all of them are quality products and none will let you down.

The DP2400 earpiece is a solid, dependable product that does a good job and doesn’t hurt your bank account. What more can you ask for?

…And so our series ends. However, we hope that you’ve found this series informative and helpful to you. With all the emphasis we place on two-way radios (across the various outposts of our little multimedia empire), it seemed overdue that we focussed a little bit on the peripherals. Glad you could join us.

If you use Motorola CP040 radios in your work, then you need to look at these earpieces

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We spend a lot of time writing about Motorola radios, so we’ve decided to do a series that focuses on the earpieces that connect to them.

Not only do a number of good companies make top-of-the-range two-way radios that are both affordable and reliable, there are also a large array of radio earpieces that range from cheap and cheerful (but nonetheless effective) to the last word in techno badassery (Editor’s Note: not actually a word).

So, kicking off our new 5-part series celebrating two-way radio earpieces, is the GP300 earpiece.

Earpieceonline.co.uk lists this thing at a paltry £11.50, but the GP300 is surprisingly high spec for such a cheap device.

Firstly, the GP300 is totally versatile, as it fits into any 2-pin Motorola radio. It may not be the best earpiece ever manufactured, but it will fit with any number of quality Motorola radios. However, I should say that the 300 does require an adaptor block to work with GP320 and GP340 series radios (oh well, you can’t have everything!)

Secondly, the sound quality is excellent; there will be no misunderstandings or botched communications when the GP300 earpiece is in use, that’s for sure. For such a cheap device, it actually reproduces sounds amazingly clearly.

Thirdly, there are the features. These features are a bit thin on the ground when compared with some of the costlier Motorola earpieces, but they still enhance the user experience and add to the overall product.

Want examples? Well, the GP300 is ergonomically designed to fit your ear canal comfortably and is easily able to fit in either the left or the right ear (whichever you happen to favour).

It also has an in-built ‘push to talk’ button, so you’re not dependent on your two-way’s controls in order to send an outgoing signal. There is also has a sprung metal clothing clip that attaches the Motorola GP300 earpiece to whatever you happen to be wearing, allowing you to be discreet, as well as to avoid tangling yourself up in cable.

Overall, the GP300 is a fine radio earpiece. Various companies have made better ones and I wouldn’t suggest this one if President Obama asks your firm to guard him on his next family skiing holiday, but for most intent and purposes, the GP300 earpiece gets the job done.

In our next episode, we’ll be taking a look at the GP340 earpiece.

Motorola have dominated the walkie talkie market for this long, can anyone compete

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There’s quite a few. It is hard to say if they have one key rival. Personally, I visualize it like Godzilla. Yes, he’s the principle monster, but he still needs to deal with King Ghidorah, Mothra, Mechagodzilla and Destroyah (amongst literally a million others).

Anyway, in this case, the communications giant Motorola is rivalled by the firms Icom, Kenwood, Cobra, Vertex and Hytera (after looking at the names you’ll possibly see why I started thinking of the Godzilla analogy).

Icom has quite an interesting company story. As detailed from their formal site,

“In 1974 Dave Stockley, founder and company Chairman, opened a retail shop in Beltinge, near Herne Bay, with partner Paul Nicholson. Initially they distributed various brands of communication equipment including Icom. They later approached Icom Inc. and were granted sole distribution rights in the UK and Republic of Ireland. This paved the way for future success. As the company grew, the present Managing Director, Philip Hadler joined. Thanet Electronics then launched a handportable for radio amateurs. This proved so successful that marine and commercial variants soon found their way to these shores. During the Falklands conflict, the company received a large order from the UK Ministry of Defence. It was all hands on deck for the small team, who modified and inspected each radio to meet the strict MoD specifications. The quality of Icom’s radios, combined with the ability to tailor each product to the users needs, created a formula for success”.

Over on Kenwood’s official site, the history section is a little less personal, however it does go out of its way to stress this company’s involvement with the world of F1 racing. It also proudly showcases that Kenwood launched the planet’s first transistor amplifier back in ’62.

Cobra’s official website carries a nicely detailed history section. Having been around in a single form of another since 1948, Cobra first establish their feet with the American consumer nearly three decades ago. Their website states that,

“The early 80s were boom years, with the introduction of cordless telephones and radar detectors. The Cobra name soon came to stand for technical innovation. By 1987, the company was propelled exclusively into the consumer electronics market and in 1993 the corporate name was formally changed from Dynascan to Cobra Electronics Corporation with the NASDAQ stock trading symbol of COBR. Cobra identified the need for unique products and renewed its focus on product innovation and high-impact merchandising. This new strategy began paying impressive dividends in 1997, when the company registered double-digit revenue growth and a five-fold increase in earnings”.

Motorola have long been an innovator and industry principal in the field of comms, from smart phones to 2 way radios and basically everything else you are able to think of.

Actually, Motorola were there right at the beginning, making one of the very first radio systems just in time for America’s entrance into WW2. But that’s a story for another point.

Using lone worker function on a 2 way radio

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In accordance with ‘Health and Safety at Work’ act of ’74, every UK-based employer is legally obliged to take care for their employees and not expose them to unwarranted risks. 

This is an efficient and noble law and one that has doubtless saved many lives since it was first approved roughly 40 years ago. This rule has too led to a development of the many new technologies aimed toward keeping staff safe…One tool that’s totally crucial to a lone worker is his or her 2 way radio.  Continue reading