Category Archives: Telecommunications

Telecommunications

How do I remove the wax from my hearing aid?

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Asked by Colin from Leicester

Hi Colin, Before we start, can I ask if you have false teeth at all?

I know what you’re thinking, “Oh, just because I have a hearing aid, I must have dentures as well! Bloody cheek!”

Well stop. I assure you, I’m not thinking that. The reason I ask is that you will need some denture cleaning tablets for the procedure I’m sharing with you, that’s all.

Anyway, if you don’t have any tablets, go out and buy some (they are usually quite affordable, in fact, I think I saw some in the Pound Shop once).

Once you have the tablets, read this next bit (see, here I’m assuming that you DON’T have any false teeth, happy now?).

OK, first of all, you need to detach the earpiece and the tube from any electronic components.

Once you’ve done that, make a small ‘bath’ big enough to fit your hearing aid earpiece into. It is imperative to use a clean glass, in order to avoid infections (“Oh, I see, now my cups are dirty!?” he says. Maybe). Add the denture-cleaning tablet to the glass and let it effervesce (which is a lovely word that I don’t get to use nearly enough, so thank you for that).

Next, soak the earpiece and the tube in the water. DO NOT add any electrical components to the water – I’m sure you won’t, but I have to make sure that other people – stupid people, if I’m honest – don’t ruin their hearing aids and them blame me for it.

Finally, take the earpiece and/or tube and allow them to dry on a clean surface. It is best not to try and manually dry the earpiece because you’re likely to miss a bit (“Oh, I see! I can’t dry off a little bit of plastic now, is that it!?” – I imagine you saying). I say this because a wet hearing aid can damage your device and also cause ear infections.

Finally, when all is dry, simply put your hearing aid back together and start living your wax-free life.

I hope that helped (and that you didn’t mind my good-natured ribbing!)

How do I remove the wax from my hearing aid?

Published by:

Asked by Colin from Leicester

Hi Colin, Before we start, can I ask if you have false teeth at all?

I know what you’re thinking, “Oh, just because I have a hearing aid, I must have dentures as well! Bloody cheek!”

Well stop. I assure you, I’m not thinking that. The reason I ask is that you will need some denture cleaning tablets for the procedure I’m sharing with you, that’s all.

Anyway, if you don’t have any tablets, go out and buy some (they are usually quite affordable, in fact, I think I saw some in the Pound Shop once).

Once you have the tablets, read this next bit (see, here I’m assuming that you DON’T have any false teeth, happy now?).

OK, first of all, you need to detach the earpiece and the tube from any electronic components.

Once you’ve done that, make a small ‘bath’ big enough to fit your hearing aid earpiece into. It is imperative to use a clean glass, in order to avoid infections (“Oh, I see, now my cups are dirty!?” he says. Maybe). Add the denture-cleaning tablet to the glass and let it effervesce (which is a lovely word that I don’t get to use nearly enough, so thank you for that).

Next, soak the earpiece and the tube in the water. DO NOT add any electrical components to the water – I’m sure you won’t, but I have to make sure that other people – stupid people, if I’m honest – don’t ruin their hearing aids and them blame me for it.

Finally, take the earpiece and/or tube and allow them to dry on a clean surface. It is best not to try and manually dry the earpiece because you’re likely to miss a bit (“Oh, I see! I can’t dry off a little bit of plastic now, is that it!?” – I imagine you saying). I say this because a wet hearing aid can damage your device and also cause ear infections.

Finally, when all is dry, simply put your hearing aid back together and start living your wax-free life.

I hope that helped (and that you didn’t mind my good-natured ribbing!)

What is a Noise-Cancelling Headset?

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There are two main methods of noise cancellation (although a third shall also be detailed a bit later on) with regards to headsets, earphones and other portable devices. Here’s a bit about them and how they work… 

The first type of noise cancellation basically occurs whenever anything obstructs the inner ear; this has the effect of dulling our ability to hear whatever’s going on around us. If you put your hands over your ears right now, or you stick your fingers in your ears, the background noise will diminish. This, in a very real sense, is a form of noise cancellation. In this regard, any set of headphones that cover the ear, or even the types that sit inside the ear, effectively cancel out background noise and are therefore ‘noise cancelling’.

The second type of noise cancellation is a little bit more complicated. Typically, these headphones cost more money, but they offset this cost by being rather clever and also very effective. The second type of headphones are those that generate a low-level of white noise around the vicinity of the speaker. The white noise, largely inaudible to the Human ear, creates a sort of ‘sound vacuum’ that eliminates all background noise, allowing you to focus purely on whatever you are listening to.

There is also one more type of noise-cancelling headset, which is the bone-conduction headset (sometimes known as ‘bonephones’), these headphones actually bypass your outer ear entirely and go instead to vibrate the tiny bones in your inner ear. Your brain still understands this every bit as much as it would if you were listening through your outer ear (or pinna) but you now have the added option of chucking good old fashioned ear plugs into the equation, whilst at the same time still continuing to use your headphones.

With gadgets like tablet computers, smartphones and MP3 players becoming more and more prevalent in modern society, headphones and earpieces are becoming increasingly commonplace. People are now trying to have conversations, listen to music or even hold video conferences in traditionally loud places.

From busy streets to crowded trains, it has never been more important for people to be able to hear content clearly and easily whilst they are ‘on the go’ – it is for this reason that noise cancelling headsets have become such a popular consumer item in the early 21st century. 

How does an aeroplane’s ‘black box’ work?

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After doing a little research, I can now tell you (basically) everything you ever wanted to know about black boxes…

In the average commercial aircraft, you’ll find the presence of multiple (usually four) microphones in the cockpit at any given time. They are located in the pilot and co-pilot’s headsets, as well as in the cockpit itself. Not only do these microphones record conversations between the pilots and cabin crew, they also record any ambient noise (such as switches being thrown or sounds generated by technical issues). The microphones all connect to the cockpit voice recorder (CVR), a master unit that stores the last 30 minutes of sound. The tape operates on a loop, essentially erasing itself every half hour. Continue reading

What kinds of things do FBI agents take with them when they’re on an job outside the office?

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You’d believe that the U . s . FBI (being the United states secret service and all) would have access to an earpiece a little bit cooler that just the conventional ‘curly cable’ job, wouldn’t you?

If pushed, We have to state that I usually imagine some old fella, like Desmond Llewelyn in the Bond movies, (or even a younger example like Ben Whishaw from ‘Skyfall’) producing all the devices himself after which explaining them to the agents before they go out and guard the President’s life. Continue reading

Keeping Up With Current Events – 2 Way Radios in Events Management

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From cultural events celebrating the diverse mosaic of British identity, to barnstorming rock n roll gigs, events management is a huge area to be involved in.

The term ‘event’ can be somewhat misleading, because technically everything is an event. Actually, when you look at it like that, maybe it isn’t so misleading after all…

When we use the term event, we could be talking about an indoor conference just as easily as a political rally. Athletic contests, art exhibitions, magic shows; if people attend it, it’s an event, and if it’s an event; it needs a manager. Continue reading

How to improve your hearing

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Recently, when I was at my younger brother’s birthday celebration, my Dad made a reference to having tinnitus (basically a low-level ringing in the ears) and I informed him that I had made a gag about tinnitus in a recent post (for those concerned, the funny story was that it made things sound ‘a lttle bit tinny’ – Not one of my better japes, I confess, but whatever…). He looked at me like I had just farted in church while I rapidly changed the subject. Continue reading

Icom Launch New Training Aids for VHF/SRC Radio Instructors

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Editorial – Some people would not know much about DSC technology, nevertheless it’s a safety system built into 2 way radios, mainly in marine and sea communications, as of the increase in use of smaller and personal boats on the rivers. As a island this tech is becoming more and more popular, the technology is linked to your boat just in case of an emergency, more details is found from this icom uk article..

DSC technology is becoming more widely used today and it is important for potential users to see how it works and to be trained in its use. To this end, Icom UK have now added their latest range of VHF/DSC radios to their VHF/SRC training simulator range. The models now available for instructors to purchase include the IC-M423 Fixed Mount VHF/DSC Transceiver and for the first time from Icom, a Handheld VHF/DSC in the form of the IC-M91D. Both training simulators provide a real ‘hands on’ experience of both voice and DSC message sending and receiving, in the classroom without causing interference. Both models share a new easy to use interface which is easy to learn, meaning that trainees will be able to understand the basics of two way radio quickly. Ian Lockyer, Marketing Manager of Icom UK Ltd, said, ’When choosing the Icom IC-M423 VHF/SRC training simulator, the instructor will receive two fully modified radios that will communicate via the cabling so that it is unlikely to cause any interference to other users nearby . This enables the trainee to send ‘live’ distress and voice calls without alerting any other radios. Both units come with an interconnecting cable up to 20 metres in length, which is ideal for any training environment. The IC-M91D is supplied with an adapter and a cable to allow it to communicate with the fixed sets.’ To help trainees further understand the need for DSC, Icom has a new microsite dedicated to Handheld DSC radio. The new website sheds light on this relatively new marine technology. It explains what DSC Handheld VHF radios are, where they can be used and why boat owners need one. It also answers several questions about the ownership and registration of DSC handheld radio in an informative FAQ section. To go to this new site, click on www.dschandheld.com. The microsite will provide a handy resource for both instructors and students alike. Ian, said, ‘Customer reaction has been incredibly positive to our recently launched IC-M91D Buoyant VHF/DSC Handheld with GPS. However we have had lots of questions regarding where and how they can be used. So we decided to put all our information on an informative microsite.’ Icom Marketing: marketing@icomuk.co.uk

02/11/2012

 

Source – http://www.icomuk.co.uk/categoryRender.asp?r=rssFeed&categoryID=3508&cCID=17736

Motorola have dominated the walkie talkie market for this long, can anyone compete

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There’s quite a few. It is hard to say if they have one key rival. Personally, I visualize it like Godzilla. Yes, he’s the principle monster, but he still needs to deal with King Ghidorah, Mothra, Mechagodzilla and Destroyah (amongst literally a million others).

Anyway, in this case, the communications giant Motorola is rivalled by the firms Icom, Kenwood, Cobra, Vertex and Hytera (after looking at the names you’ll possibly see why I started thinking of the Godzilla analogy).

Icom has quite an interesting company story. As detailed from their formal site,

“In 1974 Dave Stockley, founder and company Chairman, opened a retail shop in Beltinge, near Herne Bay, with partner Paul Nicholson. Initially they distributed various brands of communication equipment including Icom. They later approached Icom Inc. and were granted sole distribution rights in the UK and Republic of Ireland. This paved the way for future success. As the company grew, the present Managing Director, Philip Hadler joined. Thanet Electronics then launched a handportable for radio amateurs. This proved so successful that marine and commercial variants soon found their way to these shores. During the Falklands conflict, the company received a large order from the UK Ministry of Defence. It was all hands on deck for the small team, who modified and inspected each radio to meet the strict MoD specifications. The quality of Icom’s radios, combined with the ability to tailor each product to the users needs, created a formula for success”.

Over on Kenwood’s official site, the history section is a little less personal, however it does go out of its way to stress this company’s involvement with the world of F1 racing. It also proudly showcases that Kenwood launched the planet’s first transistor amplifier back in ’62.

Cobra’s official website carries a nicely detailed history section. Having been around in a single form of another since 1948, Cobra first establish their feet with the American consumer nearly three decades ago. Their website states that,

“The early 80s were boom years, with the introduction of cordless telephones and radar detectors. The Cobra name soon came to stand for technical innovation. By 1987, the company was propelled exclusively into the consumer electronics market and in 1993 the corporate name was formally changed from Dynascan to Cobra Electronics Corporation with the NASDAQ stock trading symbol of COBR. Cobra identified the need for unique products and renewed its focus on product innovation and high-impact merchandising. This new strategy began paying impressive dividends in 1997, when the company registered double-digit revenue growth and a five-fold increase in earnings”.

Motorola have long been an innovator and industry principal in the field of comms, from smart phones to 2 way radios and basically everything else you are able to think of.

Actually, Motorola were there right at the beginning, making one of the very first radio systems just in time for America’s entrance into WW2. But that’s a story for another point.

We are recommending the best headsets for sport?

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Hi and welcome to the modern series of answers to those earpiece inquiries. Ever wanted to learn about something headphone, earpiece or receiver related? Now’s your opportunity. Due to a large amount of questions we are so repeatedly asked, we have reached into our mailbag and selected the nine most pertinent (and most often submitted) inquiries. Enjoy.

Oh, by the way, if your inquiry isn’t below, then merely mail us an communication and come back in a few… you might see it featured in the later series. Cheers. Continue reading